Lesson Plan Clearinghouse

Lessonsort descending Files

Profiles of Influential Detroiters

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps third grade students answer the question, "Who were the key early Detroiters, and how did their actions help the city of Detroit grow and develop?" through primary source analysis and discussion.

Selected Mayors of Detroit

History | 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade

Students in grades six through eight will develop a good background of Detroit’s political history as well as develop an understanding of different leadership models.

Taking It to the Streets

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps fourth grade students answer the question, "What can we learn about Detroit and the history of its people by looking at maps and street names?" Students read, discuss and present information.

The Automobile and Its Impact

History | 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade

Students in grades three through five will be introduced to Detroit’s early automotive leaders through a brief dramatic reading, a secondary source. Then, using primary sources articles from newspapers and photographs, students will look at Detroit as the birthplace of the automotive age.

The French Fur Trade

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps third grade students answer the question, "How did the fur trade work, and why was it important to the economy in Detroit and the region?" through reading, role-play and discussion.

The Great Fire of 1805

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps third grade students answer the question, "What can we learn about the Great Fire of 1805 through a structured study of primary sources?"

The Musical Legacy of Detroit

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

Using historical research in primary and secondary sources, this lesson helps high school United States history students explore the music and historical undercurrents that accompany the rich musical legacy of Detroit.

The Port of Detroit

Economics | Kindergarten, 1st Grade, 2nd Grade

This lesson helps kindergarten through second grade students understand the importance of the Port of Detroit. Students will have the opportunity to examine a list of products imported through the Port of Detroit and determine their source. This will establish our link to the rest of the world and help us to realize how invaluable the Port of Detroit is to all of us in Southeastern Michigan.

The Thornton Blackburn Affair

History | 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade

Students in grades six through eight will gain an understanding of the Fugitive Slave Laws and the resulting “Black Codes” in Michigan Territory prior to the Civil War. They will explore the Thornton Blackburn Affair and the issues of civil rights.

The Trial of Ossian Sweet

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

Through this lesson and activity, students in grades nine through twelve will begin to have an understanding and knowledge of Detroit’s important and relevant civil rights history. Students will role-play and take a stand on certain issues. As part of taking a side, they will also have to provide reasons for their decision. In doing so, students will take part in an active learning experience and Core Democratic Values.

TUSKEGEE AIRMEN AND THE ARSENAL OF DEMOCRACY

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

This lesson helps High School United States History students, over two class periods, understand the important role the Tuskegee Airmen played in World War II, and that many of them were from the Detroit area.

Using Inquiry to Learn about July 1967

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

In this lesson, high school students will gain a basic understanding of the causes, events, and impacts of the 1967 unrest. However, instead of simply reading a text for comprehension, they will approach the material through the process of historical inquiry.

WORLD WAR II POSTERS, 1940-1945

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

This lesson uses posters and prints archived in the Detroit Historical Museum’s digital collection to show high school students the importance that printed materials played in the total war effort and the significance of using primary sources in the classroom. The educator will use LOC analysis sheets, reasons for using primary sources, and the “gallery walk” teaching strategy.

You Be the Judge: the Surrender of Detroit

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps third grade students answer the question, "Was American General William Hull, who surrendered Detroit to the British during the War of 1812, guilty or innocent of treason and cowardice?" Students analyze primary sources and consider multiple perspectives in history.

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