Lesson Plan Clearinghouse

Lessonsort descending Files

DETROIT DURING WWII: WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

Bring your 9th - 12th grade students to the movie screen to judge for themselves if the United States government was looking out for the best interest of women or was guilty of perpetuating the second class status of females.

Detroit Flag and Seal

Civics | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps fourth grade students answer the question, "What symbols represent Detroit, and why are they important?" through reading and primary source analysis.

Detroit Thrift Gardens

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

This lesson introduces high school students to primary source analysis. Students will study photographs of Detroiters in the 1970s.

Detroit Under Three Flags: 1701-1796

History | 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade

Students in grades six through eight will gain a preliminary history of early Detroit and the three main countries that ruled the city. Students will participate in class discussion and mapping activities that will lead to a better understanding of some of the Core Democratic Values.

Documenting Detroit

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

This lesson introduces middle and high school students to primary source analysis. Students review photographs about Detroit's urban farming project during the Great Depression.

Exploring Anishinabeg Culture

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps third grade students answer the question, "What are key cultural traits of the Native Americans who lived in Michigan before the arrival of Europeans?" through primary source analysis and discussion.

Exploring Ethnic Detroit

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps fourth grade students answer the question, "Who were the different ethnic groups that came to Detroit in the 19th century, when did they arrive and where did they live?" through primary source analysis and discussion.

Five Themes of Geography and Detroit

Geography | Kindergarten, 1st Grade, 2nd Grade

This lesson was developed to help Kindergarten through Second Grade students gain a view of Detroit that they can relate to and connect with on a personal basis.

FORD MOTOR COMPANY AND THE ARSENAL OF DEMOCRACY

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

This lesson helps High School United States History students, over two class periods, understand the important role the Ford Motor Company played in the development of war products during World War II.

FORT WAYNE: SUPPLYING THE ARSENAL OF DEMOCRACY

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

This lesson will explore the impact that Fort Wayne had during WWII and its role in the “Arsenal of Democracy.” By examining its history both written and visually, we will be able to understand why this forgotten piece of Detroit history has served such a vital role when called upon.

French Ribbon Farms

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps third grade students answer the question, "What did the French settlement of Detroit look like, and why?" through primary source and map analysis, as well as reading and discussion.

From Farming to Industrialization in Detroit

History | 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade

Through graphing census population numbers, students in grades six through eight will see how industry attracted large numbers of people during the years between 1810 and 1910.

Habitants and Voyaguers

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps third grade students answer the question, "What was daily life like for the French settlers in early Detroit?" through reading and discussion.

Industrial Detroit: from Ore to Object

History | 4th Grade, 5th Grade

This lesson helps fourth grade students answer the question, "How did Detroiters turn raw natural resources into finished products in the late 1800s?" through primary source analysis and discussion.

Labor Organization and Detroit's Sit-Down Strikes, 1937

History | 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

The right to organize had been granted by the National Labor relations Act of 1935. The right to organize was won by workers in a series of confrontations known as sit-down strikes. Through this lesson, students in grades nine through twelve will gain a better understanding of this process.

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